Tech UPTechnologyUndressing Einstein

Undressing Einstein

On a sunny Friday morning, March 14, 1879, a fat, misshapen-headed baby was born. So much so that her grandmother complained: “Too fat!” The next day, his father, a mattress dealer, went to the registry. “No. 224. Today, the merchantHermann Einstein, resident of Ulm, 135 Bahnhofstrasse B street, of Israelite faith, personally known, appeared before the undersigned registry official and declared that of his wifePauline Einstein, born Koch, of Israelite faith, […] was born at 11:30 in the morning, a male child who was given the name Albert. “

Little did Einstein live in Ulm. The following year his father, advised by his brother Jakob, decidedmove to Munichto start a gas and water installations business together. But that was not the real goal. Jakob, an engineer by training, wanted to be part of the new world of electrical engineering (the first electrically lit street was Main Street in Californian Menlo Park on New Years Eve 1879). Jakob had invented a dynamo that he wanted to market. Einstein lived part of his childhood in a beautiful house on the outskirts of Munich, where his sister Marie would be born – or Maja as Einstein would call her all his life – to whom he was always very close.

Although Einstein himself said that he began to speak late, when he was over three years old, this is not entirely true; her grandmother remembers in a letter “her funny ideas” when she was two years old. Another of the most widespread myths about the boy Albert is that he did not do well in school. On the contrary, it was aapplied student: “He is still the top of his class and the grades are excellent,” wrote his mother. The family environment led the young Albert to approach science and mathematics: his father had a natural talent for them that he could not develop, because his family could not afford it, and his uncle was passionate about science and technology; he taught her the Pythagorean theorem.

When she was five years old, her parents hired a governess to get her some formal education, but it ended abruptly when Albert threw a chair at her head. His mother Pauline, a woman of strong character – quite the opposite of her husband, a quiet and rather passive man – was a talented pianist and passed on her passion for music to her children: Albertthe violinand Maja the piano.

Little Albert had a certaininclination to lonelinessand he loved games that required patience, like building castle of cards up to 14 stories high. It is striking that as a very childhe was horrified by the militaryto the point of having a real dread of parades. This aversion to imposed authority suffered at the institute, the Luitpold Gymnasium. There a teacher once told him that he would be much happier not having him as a student in his class. “But I have done nothing wrong!” Einstein replied. “Yes, that’s true,” replied the teacher. “But you sit in the back row and smile, and that violates the feeling of respect that a teacher needs in his class.” That boy who smiled at school was later the old man who when they told him that the father of the atomic bomb, Robert Oppenheimer, was going to be accused of being a Soviet spy, laughed and said: “What you have to do is go to Washington , tell the officials they are crazy and go home. “

Business did not go well and in 1894 the Einstein family took over a factory in Pavia, near Milan, leaving Einsteinintern at the institute. Desperately alone and deeply hating the Germanic mentality of the military “goose step”, he left for Italy without finishing the course and with the determined intention ofrenounce your German nationality. In Italy he spent the happiest moments of his life, living at his own pace, traveling, listening to music, reading … But business went bad again and his father encouraged him to secure a future. Einstein decided to prepare for himself byentrance examination of the Polytechnic of Zurich. Suspended.

The director of the Polytechnic urged him to prepare at the Aargau Cantonal School in the city of Aarau. Accustomed to the iron Germanic discipline, the spirit of freedom that was breathed there surprised Einstein. And it was in Aarau, at the age of 16, that he posed an insignificant question that haunted him for a long time: What impression would a light wave make on someone moving at the same speed? Thespecial theory of relativity.

Already at the Polytechnic he met who would be his first wife, Mileva Maric, a Serbian four years older than him and has been since childhood. His love for her pitted him against his parents, especially his controlling mother Pauline: “You will spoil your future and close the way to your own life.” After a time of mere survival, hopping from one temp job to another – when he had one – with an impoverished family and an increasingly ill father, Einstein was hired at theBern Patent Officeon June 23, 1902. Four months later his father died giving consent to his wedding with Mileva.

And the miraculous year 1905 arrived. Einstein published inAnnals of Physicsfour articles destined to make history. His genius came to light and he was offered academic positions. Max Planck, the father of quantum theory, compared Einstein to Copernicus. But in 1919, when his prediction that the Sun’s gravity bent the path of light rays was verified, he was canonized. He was given his name to children and cigars and the London Palladium asked him to appear on stage for three weeks, setting his own salary. The media titled his theories as the greatest achievements of human thought and his equations appeared on the front page of newspapers.

At the beginning of the 30s the universities of Oxford, Jerusalem, Paris, Madrid and Leyden offered him all kinds of perks as long as he was their professor. But it was the newly created Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton who took him. On October 17, 1933, Einstein, in the company of his second wife, Elsa, his secretary Helen Dukas, and his assistant Walther Mayer, arrived in New York. As physicist Paul Langevin put it, “The Pope of Physics has moved house andThe United States has become the world center for natural sciences“There, among the trees that led to his home on Mercer Street, the legend was forged.

On October 1, 1940, in Trenton, New Jersey, Einstein along with his stepdaughter Margot (left) and his secretary Dukas (right) swear their American citizenship.

But Einstein was not just a physicist. He was also committed to humanity . His uncompromising pacifism – he often lent his name to declarations for peace – was truncated by staunchly supporting the construction of the atomic bomb . He even copied back in his own handwriting the original article on relativity that he published in 1905 to raise funds for the war – at one point, while dictating to his secretary, he raised his head and exclaimed, “Did I say that? I could have done it without so many complications “? At the auction it reached 6 million dollars.

Einstein was also a politically committed man. He admired the political courage of people like Walter Rathenau, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Weimar Republic. After his murder he wrote: “It is not worth being an idealist when one lives in Babia; he was an idealist even living on earth and knowing its stench like almost no one.” But there was something that did not make him a good politician. Bertrand de Jouvenel said that the main characteristic of a political problem was that it admits of a fix, but no solution. Something unacceptable for the great physicist. Thus, when Israel’s President Chaim Weizmann died in November 1952 and Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion decided to offer him the presidency, he asked his personal secretary: “And what do we do if he accepts?” Luckily for them, it didn’t.

On April 18, 1955, an hour after midnight, his heart stopped beating. Two days earlier he had said to a close friend: “Don’t be so sad. We all have to die.”


 

Dismantling the myth

The affable and humble physicist also had an illegitimate daughter, a failed marriage, showed disdain for the people around him and only loved one thing in his life: science.

“If everyone lived a life like mine there would be no need for novels,” Albert Einstein told his sister Maja when he was just a 20-year-old who had just applied for Swiss citizenship. The problem is that a good part of that life was hidden from the public and historians of science by their legal representatives. Thus, when his son Hans Albert died of a heart attack in 1973, many of his father’s secrets lay inside a shoebox in the kitchen of his Berkeley home: family correspondence since the late 1800s. The collection was so delicate that the executors of the physicist’s estate, who had legal control over the publication of his words, went to court to prevent Hans Albert from publishing part of them after his father’s death. It is not surprising that the guardians of the reputation of the sage , his secretary Helen Dukas and the economist Otto Nathan , received the nickname “the priests of Einstein.” What could be hidden in the letters and writings of the man of the century in Time magazine?

After the sage’s death, his secretary Helen Dukas became a staunch defender of his reputation, so that no fact of his life that could tarnish it was revealed abroad. He maintained the idealized image of the physicist and did not allow any historian to have access to the real Einstein.

Einstein defined himself as a manlonely, aClamp(a carriage drawn by a single horse), and that is how his life should be understood. Bertrand Russell described him as someone for whom personal matters did not occupy much of his mind. His image of an eccentric genius and committed to humanity made him, as Einstein himself joked, a Jewish saint. However, he was a man whosewords in public contradicted his deeds in private, was a man “whose combination of intellectual vision and emotional myopia left behind a series of damaged lives.”

The first of these was that of Marie Winteler, the beautiful daughter of the couple who welcomed sixteen-year-old Einstein to Aarau when he was preparing for admission to the Zurich Polytechnic. Marie was two years older than him and they both fell deeply in love, like the two teenagers they were. His stay there was one of the happiest periods of his life. But when he finished high school and went to the Polytechnic in 1896, things changed. Einstein suggested, without warning, that they should stop being written. Moreover, and according to Marie’s letters, Albert seemed to accuse her of wanting to end their relationship by going as a teacher to Olsberg, northwest of Aarau and further away from Zurich, where he was going. But that didn’t stop him from sending the dirty clothes to Marie to be washed. The relationship continued, more out of Marie’s efforts than Albert, who had laid eyes on a classmate, Mileva Maric. It is not very clear when he ended his relationship with Marie – he simply stopped writing it – but on spring break of his first year in Zurich he went to see his family in Pavia instead of waiting for Marie to join him. him just as he had planned for the winter. The breakup plunged Marie into a deep depression from which she took many years to emerge. When he got married, Einstein told his friend Besso that it ended one of the worst black spots of his life.

Meanwhile, all the interest of the young Einstein was directed to the Serbian and lame Mileva. And is that Einsteinhe always liked the company of women, although they were never above his passion for science. Marie, aware of her intellectual inferiority to Albert, feared that she would be little to him and that because of that he would lose interest in her. That was not the case with Mileva. Accustomed to the bourgeois and almost frivolous conversations of the women to whom he had devoted his attentions, Einstein was fascinated by it. And while Marie wrote to him from Olsberg, Albert went to concerts with Mileva.

In 1900, the year of the undergraduate examination, Section VI A, Physics and Mathematics, at the Zurich Polytechnic had 5 students: Marcel Grossmann, the scion of a rich family who stood by his side in times of hardship and who, Through his father, he got him a job at the Patent Office; Jakob Ehrat, often Einstein’s desk companion and whose mother he would visit whenever he felt lonely; Louis Kollros, who would get the highest score in the decisive final exam; and the Serbian with dark eyes and beautiful voice Mileva, 21 years old.

Their relationship grew slowly during the 4 years of studies at the Polytechnic. Einstein saw her as his intellectual comrade, and by the time of the exam the friendship had turned into romance. The already Swiss citizen was fourth (4.91 out of 6) andMileva did not approve, something that deeply depressed her. But the love between them was going to face a great challenge: Einstein’s mother. When he saw that this relationship was more than just one of his classic flirtations, he became very angry. As a good German, Pauline believed that Serbs were of a lower class. And not only that: “She is a book, just like you (…). But you should have a woman. When you are 30 years old, she will be an old witch.”

In January 1902 an “incident” occurred that was to profoundly mark their relationship and of which nothing was known until 1987:Mileva gave birth to a daughter, Lieserl. The attitude of Einstein, who was working as a teacher in Schaffhausen while Mileva was staying in Zurich, is striking. During the pregnancy her letters reveal an expectant and excited father. However, after Lieserl’s birth, he adopted adistant and cold attitude. He did not mention her again in his letters andnever went to see her. After a pact of silence, no one would write about her again. Einstein’s illegitimate daughter disappears from history two weeks after her birth and has never been heard from again.

The relationship between the two suffered and Mileva was never the same again. To this should be added that for the second time he failed the licensure exam. Nonetheless,they marriedon January 6, 1903. Einstein, already in the Patent Office, turned to his work and Mileva’s scientific expertise made him “her colleague.” Could this, in the long run, affect your marriage? Years later he confessed: “Very few women are creative. I would not send my daughter to study Physics. I am happy that my (second) wife does not know anything about science.” For Einstein,science made women sour. Perhaps that is why he said of Marie Curie: “she has never heard birds sing.”
Over the years, the marriage became rare. By May 1912 the discord was already obvious. By then Einstein had resumed his relationship withhis cousin Elsa, who would be his second wifeThe first message Einstein sent him on April 30 was a nervous declaration of love. His role in the disintegration of the marriage is unclear due to the natural secrecy with which Einstein wrapped his life. The truth is that the evolution of the Einstein-Mileva marriage from that year until their divorce in 1919, just the year in which the physicist became a revered figure worldwide, was the classic: distancing, fights, lack of relationship … . evengot to hit it.

His sons, Hans Albert and Eduard, suffered separation and were used as a throwing weapon. The relationship he had with them was irregular: yesHe served as a father, but science was always above. A critical moment occurred when Eduard suffered a mental breakdown. Mileva and Hans Albert asked him to return to Switzerland to help them. Einstein replied that he preferred to stay in Berlin, where he was then a teacher. First, because he believed that he could do good scientific work there; second, because he was convinced that Mileva had poisoned her children against him. Eduard, a schizophrenic, ended his days in a mental institution in Switzerland.

Einstein divorced on February 14, 1919 and married Elsa on June 2. His second wife was the partner he needed: she cared for him as lovingly as a mother could. Einstein, turned into a legendary figure, was dedicated to his true love: science. Of course, he did not neglect women. Many scholars think that they were, almost without exception, purely platonic relationships but intense enough that his two wives were jealous. To the point that Elsa, faced with the open secret of the relationship between her husband and Margarete Lebach, a young blonde Austrian, was advised by her daughters to separate.

Little by little Einstein made cynical comments about the marriage: “It had to be invented by a pig without imagination, slavery in a cultural package …”. Some have accused him of misogyny, but his attitude towards women was the same as towards men: he treated all with distant courtesy and kindness. Einstein was a man concerned with humanity, but indifferent to specific human beings, whom he valued solely for their intellectual capacity (which is why Elsa always felt inferior).

The success of his theories made him a legend, even among his own colleagues. The great physicist Wolfgang Pauli, a man who was not exactly characterized by being respectful, treated Einstein differently from the rest. He was revered as a god, although he himself was essentially modest and kind. “I speak in the same way with everyone, be it garbage man or university rector.” Of course he had his ego too. Once, Einstein submitted an article to the magazinePhysical Review. The publisher had the audacity to do what is always done in scientific publications: send it to other scientists for review and await their judgment as to whether it was of sufficient quality to publish. He did not like this at all: he never sent his work to that magazine again.


Science in its purest form

In 1905, Einstein wrote a series of works that were to revolutionize Physics. Ten years later, his brilliant brain revolutionized our perception of the universe. This is how he did it.

In 1902 the Olympia Academy was founded in Bern, dedicated to discussing science and philosophy. It was a peculiar society, made up of only three members: Maurice Solovine, Conrad Habicht, and Albert Einstein. Three years later, Solovine and Habicht left town and the Academy was disbanded, but they remained in contact. In the spring Einstein wrote to Habicht, promising him four works: “The first deals with the characteristics of radiation and is very revolutionary. The second work is the determination of the true size of the atom … The third shows that bodies in suspension in a fluid and with dimensions of one thousandth of a millimeter, they must undergo a disorderly movement produced by thermal agitation. The fourth work is on the electrodynamics of moving bodies, using a modification of the theory of space and time “.

No sooner said than done. That year, 1905, he sent 5 articles to the magazineAnnals of Physics: the one that led him to the Nobel Prize for hisexplanation of the photoelectric effect(March 18th); the one that made him scientifically famous by explaining theBrownian movement(May 11); the one who laid the foundations of thespecial theory of relativity(June 30th); the one that contains the most famous equation in history,E = mc2(September 27th); and a second, less interesting work on Brownian motion (December 19). As a tip, in addition, a doctoral thesis where he raises anew way to measure the size of molecules(April 30), which became his most cited work.

The articles on Brownian motion and his doctoral thesis have their origin in two central problems in physics at the beginning of the 20th century. The first was the very existence of molecules: how to prove that they are real? The second was a consequence of the first. If they are real, how to relate their motion to concepts like temperature?

The solution to the first question could have occurred to him while he was drinking tea. When you put a lump in the water, it dissolves and diffuses throughout the cup, making it more viscous. From this simple observation, Einstein deduced a way to calculate the size of molecules and a value for a fundamental constant called theAvogadro’s number, which tells how many molecules of a gas are in a given volume under specific conditions.With it you can determine the mass of any atom. This was the content of his thesis. The funny thing is that when it was sent to the University of Zurich, the person in charge of evaluating it, Alfred Kleiner, rejected it for being too short. Einstein added one more sentence and it was accepted.

The Annals articles discuss a phenomenon studied in 1827 by British Museum botanist-curator Robert Brown: pollen grains suspended in water move erratically and impossible to predict. In 1905 no one had managed to explain this Brownian motion.

The theoretical and mathematical problems he faced were insurmountable, but Einstein saved them with his brilliant physical intuition. On the one hand, he said, we have the microscopic behavior of the pollen grain, which we can assimilate into a giant molecule. For another, that grain is large enough that it also obeys the same laws that govern the motion of a solid in a liquid, such as a submarine. Einstein concluded that by measuring the mean displacement of pollen he could calculate the value of fundamental constants such as Avogadro’s number. The spark of his genius are the words mean displacement: it does not matter the actual route but the distance in a straight line from the beginning to the end (imagine a car going up a pass; it does not matter how many turns the road takes – the Brownian road -; of interest is the distance traveled in a straight line). With all this it follows that pollen moves because water molecules collide with it as in a microscopic billiard. Therefore, heat is nothing more than molecular agitation. Einstein hadproved the existence of atoms.

Despite the importance of these works, popular imagery associates Einstein with the special theory of relativity. With it, he not only eliminated the ether from the universe, that subtle substance that filled space and allowed light to travel through the cosmos, but also resolved the profound discrepancy between mechanics, which deals with objects in motion, and the electromagnetism. The situation was critical: either classical mechanics, that of Galileo’s time, was changed, or the same was done with the electromagnetic theory enunciated by Maxwell in the 19th century.

Einstein, against all odds, opted for the first option. Such a decision led him to affirm thatthe speed of light is unbeatableand therefore we must stop considering time and space as absolute. They are not separate entities but form a space-time continuum that depends on the observer. As light carries information and its speed is finite, two simultaneous events for someone do not have to be for another. Time is relative, the ticking of the clock depends on the speed at which it is moving. And the most surprising: within this theory is hidden E = mc2, an equation that demonstrated all its power with the atomic bomb.

Now, the article that changed the world and for which, after eight years as a nominee,received the Nobel Prize, was “On a heuristic point of view concerning the production and transformation of light”. In it, he explained how photoelectric cells work: Why are there materials that emit electrons when light of a certain color (frequency) falls on them? The photoelectric effect is inexplicable if we admit that light is a wave. For this reason Einstein gave a twist to Max Planck’s proposal of 1900 where he said that matter emits and absorbs energy in the form of small packages or quanta. Einstein stated that not only did that happen, but that energy, light itself, was made up of quanta:photons.

Einstein is one of the fathers of the most perfect theory of science, thequantum mechanics, butalways denied herbecause it leads to the disappearance of causality: “God does not play dice.” She even said that being so good was clear proof that she was wrong. This stance reveals his character: Einstein might be radical, but not a rebel. Relativity never meant such a drastic break.

After such a display of intellectual pyrotechnics, we had to wait two years, until 1907, for something similar to happen again. Sitting at his table in the patent office he had a thought: If a person falls freely, he does not feel his own weight. “It was the happiest thought of my life,” he said. He had just opened the door to his masterpiece: the general theory of relativity. Einstein had discovered the equivalence principle: Locked in a closet, there is no way to distinguish whether we are on a planet or traveling through space at constant acceleration.

With the invaluable help of his mathematician friend Marcel Grossmann, Einstein worked hard for several years. In November 1915 he presented his theory at the Prussian Academy of Sciences, “the happiest moment of my life.” In those lessons he presented a theory that connected the geometry of space with the matter present in it: the value of the curvature at a point in space is a measure of the gravity existing at that point. The higher the density of the object, the greater the curvature and, therefore, the greater the gravity.

General relativity is one of the most important theories in physics. Its charm was confirmed in the total eclipse of 1919, when astrophysicist Arthur Stanley Eddington observed the deflection of light rays from stars as they passed near the Sun: the stars were not where they should be, but where Einstein said. Upon confirmation,The New York Timescalled it “one of the greatest successes in the history of human thought.”


Einstein’s legacy

From the interior of the atom to the structure of space, passing through the heart of galaxies, nothing can be understood without using his ideas. His works have decisively influenced the Physics of the twentieth century.

In 1969 the SerbianMileva Maric biography. The author, Desanka Trbuhovic-Gjuric, defended that part of thespecial relativity was the creation, not of Einstein, but of his first wife. It was not the first time this type of accusation had been launched, nor was it the last. Its paternity in the key equations of general relativity has also been questioned. Some historians have pointed out that the article where the equations of the gravitational field first appear was sent by Einstein to the Berlin Academy of Sciences on November 25, 1915, but 5 days before the great Göttingen mathematician David Hilbert sent another entitled ” The foundations of Physics “where the equations of general relativity also appear. Could Einstein have been inspired by this article that we know Hilbert sent him to find the equations he has been searching for since 1907? In principle it is possible, although what is undeniable is thatthe correct interpretation belongs, without a doubt, to Einstein.

However, both accusations do not stand. The first, because at no time in her life did Mileva comment on such a point and there is no indication in the documents of the time that would make us think so (some conspiranoids have wanted to see in the fact that Einsteinwill give all of the Nobel Prize money to Mileva, as promised in the divorce, a form ofhush your voice). The second could only be resolved in Einstein’s favor in 1999 because the first proofs of Hilbert’s article were found, dated December 6, 1915.

Einstein’s paternity of both theories is thus undeniable. What is certain is thatformal construction of both theories was the work of others: Minkowski for special relativity and Hilbert and Noether himself, among others, for general. Thus, the first solution to the equations of general relativity was found by the director of the Postdam Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild. At the age of forty, he enlisted as a volunteer at the beginning of the First World War and while on the Russian front in December 1915, he found an analytical solution to the problem of a point mass located in empty space. Unfortunately, he was unable to defend his work at the Academy. During his stay on the Eastern Front he contracted a skin disease, pemphigus, at that time incurable and deadly. Urgently repatriated, he died on May 11, 1916 in a hospital in Potsdam.

One of its greatest achievements is that the description of space-time found correctly explains the gravitational field of the Solar System. However, what is really fascinating is that that very description introduces one of the most puzzling objects in physics: theblack hole. Schwarzschild showed that if a mass is sufficiently concentrated, the curvature of space in nearby regions will reach such a magnitude that it will be separated, isolated, from the rest of the Universe. Any mass that rushes into it will be irretrievably lost.

General relativity also predicts thatthe Universe is expanding. When Einstein discovered this consequence, he couldn’t believe it. To avoid this, he modified the equations by introducing a non-theory term thatstopped that expansion: thecosmological constant. When later the astronomer Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the Universe, Einstein declared that the introduction of the cosmological constant had been thebiggest mistake of his life.

Who took full advantage of the cosmology locked in general relativity was a Russian meteorologist named Alexander Friedmann, who chose to solve the equations to discover what the future of the Universe would be. And he found that there are only two options: an open Universe in continuous expansion, and a closed Universe, where the expansion stops and begins to contract. Then the Belgian Georges Lemâitre came into action, a priest with a fiery passion for Physics, who, following Friedmann’s ideas, thought that if the film of the Universe was played backwards, towards the origin of everything, matter would have to have been concentrated. at one point, which he christened with the name ofprimitive atom. Today his extravagant idea is accepted by cosmologists around the world andLemâitreis recognized as thefather of the Big Bang.

But the great revolution in Physics came from Einstein who showed that thelightpresentstwo natures: corpuscular, like pellets fired at a fair, andundulatorylike the waves in a pond. This vision was completed in 1924 by the Frenchman Louis de Broglie, stating that even Balinese did not always have to behave like Balinese; they could also behave like the waves in the pond. The same matter presents this wave-corpuscle duality. The next step was taken by Werner Heisenberg, who created a mathematical scheme known as matrix mechanics, with which he was able to reproduce the results of the old quantum theory, and Erwin Schrödinger, who offered a mathematical formulation to de Broglie’s theories: he was born so thewave mechanics. Paul AM Dirac showed that both were equivalent formulations of what has since been known as quantum mechanics. With it, we have not only been able to build televisions and computers, but we have discovered the true internal structure of matter and it leads us to the dream of an all-encompassing theory.

This is Einstein’s legacy: a new vision of the world, from the very small to the immensely large. A vision in which space itself has become an elastic fabric that stretches and deforms and the course of time depends on the speed at which we move.

 

 

Einstein is still right

General Relativity is one of the most robust theories in science, passing each of the tests that have been put to it. He recently did it again.

The Nobel Committee against Einstein

For years, the Swedish Academy of Sciences - responsible for awarding the Nobel Prizes in Physics - refused to award the award to Albert Einstein for reasons that were not scientific at all.

A ray of light contains more information than you think

A simple ray of light, a jet of photons, is capable of giving us information about the temperature, composition, speed and distance of the star that emitted it.

The legacy of Albert Einstein: the Theory of Relativity

On this day Albert Einstein was born in Germany, author of the theory of relativity, who determined that the laws of physics are the same for all non-accelerating observers.

An asteroid that was going to hit Earth in 2023 turns out to be...

For a few days in January, asteroid 2022 AE1 became the most dangerous asteroid observed in more than a decade.

More