Tech UPTechnologyWhy do we need to lie?

Why do we need to lie?

Luis Muiño has been practicing psychotherapy for 30 years, both in private practice and in social intervention in different countries (Kosovo, El Salvador, Angola, …).

As a popularizer, he is currently focused on his articles for Muy Interesante magazine and on the podcast Understand your mind . He has also written in the newspapers La Vanguardia and El Confidencial, is the author of several books and has directed various radio programs (Radio Nacional de España, Cadena COPE) Thanks to these collaborations, he has won eight journalism awards related to dissemination to date. of psychology.

Luis Muiño has participated in Homo curiosus with his talk “Why do we need to lie?”, Which has been accompanied by the documentary The whole truth about lies.

“Lying is an adaptive mechanism and very important for survival,” the expert told us. “In fact, the Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis says that we are the primates that have developed the most precisely thanks to this ability to pretend.”

Is the need to lie genetic?

I think so, but as in all these issues it is very difficult to discern between what is a cultural or environmental factor or what is genetic.

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Everyone lies several times a day. This may seem immoral, it could be in our genes and it is a capacity that develops from childhood. But not all lies are the same. Some are seen as necessary tools for a healthy social base, while others are spoken with fraudulent intent or self-interest. Using lie detectors and thermal cameras, scientists try to figure out how the lying mechanism actually works.

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