NewsMan blows up apartment in revenge on landlord

Man blows up apartment in revenge on landlord

Dangerous act of revenge: A tenant in Spain blew up an entire apartment building – apparently because he wanted revenge on his landlord.

Ponferrada – This act of revenge seems a bit exaggerated: A tenant blew up his own apartment in the Spanish city of Ponferrada on the night of Thursday, January 13, 2022 – because he wanted to take revenge on his landlord. At around 4 a.m. residents on Calle Alcón in the city center were woken up by a loud gas explosion. Fortunately, no one was injured, but the incident caused significant property damage.
Kreiszeitung.de* reveals why the tenant wanted to take revenge on his landlord.

In addition to the roof of the building, the facade and the upper floor, two cars on the street were also completely destroyed by the explosion. Adjacent houses were also damaged. Shortly after the incident, the 35-year-old man turned himself in to local police and has now been taken into custody. * kreiszeitung.de is an offer from IPPEN.MEDIA.

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