NewsNora Tschirner talks about depression

Nora Tschirner talks about depression

The actress doesn’t want to be “Everybody’s Darling” or make money. Is she afraid that her depression will negatively affect her career?

Berlin (dpa) – Actress Nora Tschirner (“Keinohrhasen”, “Tatort”) says she is not afraid that statements about her depression could have an impact on her career.

“My value system does not envisage making money, having a career and being everybody’s darling,” said the native of Berlin in an interview with the newspaper “tz” (Monday). If she could no longer make films, she would still be professionally “broad enough to be able to do other things,” said the 39-year-old. “That is of course an absolute privilege.”

In March 2019, the actress first spoke about depression in a podcast. Last month, in an interview with the “Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin”, she openly reported on her symptoms, her first therapy and the “low point” ten years ago. To talk about the topic, she sees as “social market research”, Tschirner told the “tz” now. It is important to find out how the public is dealing with it and what needs to be changed.

“A lot has happened in the past few years, but only five percent of what has to happen,” said Tschirner. Often those affected still did not receive any therapy. “Not because they don’t want to, but because they know: they have statutory health insurance, they are in the system and can fall through the cracks. There is still a lot of madness in bags. “

She advises young actors in a similar situation to weigh carefully whether they want to make their illness public. “People who stand more securely can do that.” In any case, those affected should take their illness seriously and ask for help.

© dpa-infocom, dpa: 210518-99-640200 / 2

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