LivingTravelBest Thai Street Food Dishes to Try in Bangkok

Best Thai Street Food Dishes to Try in Bangkok

Street food is everywhere in Thailand. Vendors set up stalls where you can get something to go or you can stop for a meal at nearby tables and chairs. If you don’t know what street foods to order, it can be a bit overwhelming. Don’t be afraid to be adventurous though – you just might find a new favorite dish to make at home. Here are some popular Thai street food dishes to consider during your trip.

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I am there

Somtam, a sweet, sour, spicy, and salty salad made from grated green papayas, tomatoes, garlic, shrimp, peanuts, and chili peppers, is one of the most popular street foods in Thailand. You can find it in almost any area with street food. The flavor combination may not be familiar, but it is delicious, refreshing, and healthy. Most Thais like their som tam spicy, so when ordering be sure to order a mild version if necessary.

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Noodle Soup

Cool Teow, or Noodle Soup, is the most popular Thai street food dish. It comes from China (hence the Chinese name), but has become Thai over the years. The soup is made from chicken, pork, or beef broth, and the noodles are either rice noodles or egg noodles (you can choose). Most vendors throw in some veggies and sliced meat, meatballs, or wontons. So how is it uniquely Thai? Seasonings such as dried chili peppers, sugar, lime juice, and fish sauce are added.

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Pad Thai

Everyone knows pad Thai, the country’s famous stir-fry noodle dish with shrimp, tofu and a touch of tamarind. Pad Thai is not as popular in Thailand as it is abroad, but most street food vendors who prepare French fries also offer the dish.

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Pad See Ew

Like pad Thai, pad see ew is a safe option. It’s also not that spicy and actually has a bit of sweetness. The wide rice noodles are sautéed and then eggs, broccoli or Chinese cabbage, and dark soy sauce are added. Common meats used are beef, pork, or chicken. Sometimes dried chili flakes, vinegar, or both are added.

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Kai Jeow

Kai jeow is one of the most common and cheapest items on Thai food street vendors. It is an omelette served over rice with a fluffy interior and a crisp on the outside that is an excellent option for breakfast. Fish sauce, chili sauce and chili peppers are added.

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Roast meats

Moo ping, or grilled pork skewers, is another very popular street food, but it’s not just pork skewers that you will find on the street. There is also grilled chicken and sometimes even grilled buffalo. Each street food vendor has their own recipe for the marinade, but it is usually sweet and garlic.

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Poh Pia Tod

One food that you may have tried at home is spring rolls. Sellers usually cut them into smaller pieces to make them easier to eat on the go. Depending on the vendor, the different ingredients used include meat, rice noodles, or vegetables. Fresh spring rolls (pa pia sod) are also delicious but much healthier because they are not fried.

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Thai desserts

Thai street food is convenient, but it can also be indulgent. You will find many sweets and desserts that are sold alongside the noodles and grilled meats. Mango sticky rice is only available in busy areas, but you can always find fresh fruit, fried bananas, and Thai sweets.

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