LivingTravelThe most amazing things to do in Asakusa, Tokyo

The most amazing things to do in Asakusa, Tokyo

Tokyo is, by some measures, the largest city in the world. On the other hand, as you probably realize if you’ve ever been there, it’s less of a traditional metropolis centered around a nuclear power plant, and more of a compilation of smaller cities, each with its own unique character and flavor.

The importance of the Asakusa district is hard to overstate, both for its general popularity among travelers to Tokyo, and for the wide range of attractions there. Check out this guide before you make the trip to Asakusa to make sure you don’t miss a thing!

01
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He rides a traditional rickshaw

Most of what you see when you arrive in Asakusa is decidedly futuristic (more on that in a second), so it may surprise you to learn that the best way to see this district is by rickshaw. And not just any rickshaw (which is an old-fashioned form of transportation even in a motorized “tuk-tuk” form), but perhaps the most traditional type of all: pulled by young men using only the force of their bodies.

As well as being a lovely way to see Asakusa, riding a rickshaw also paints the most extensive portrait in the district. Since many of the drivers are local or intimately familiar with Asakusa, you’ll enjoy trips down seemingly random alleys that could be the greatest treasures of your entire Japan itinerary!

02
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Tour of the oldest temple in Tokyo

Direction
2-chōme-3-1 Asakusa, Taito City, Tōkyō-to 111-0032, Japan

Get directions

Telephone

+81 3-3842-0181

Web

Visit the website

In fact, once you pierce its surface just a little bit, you will realize that Asakusa is definitely one of the oldest neighborhoods in Tokyo. The Senso-ji Temple, for example, is technically the oldest temple in the city, having been built for the first time in 645 AD. (You should note that it has been rebuilt several times, first after the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, then during the bombings of WWII.)

Of course, the Japanese do their best to be true to the original architectural and design principles every time they have to rebuild something. Senso-ji will enchant you as if it were original, even if it is not.

03
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Go back in time

Rickshaws and temples aren’t the only relics of the past you’ll find in Asakusa, either. The district’s excellent museums help you put together a picture of what Asakusa was like during Japan’s Edo period (and even before), featuring an engaging survey of art, cuisine, culture, and more.

The Edo Shitamachi Traditional Crafts Museum, for example, not only exhibits crafts that were popular during the Edo period, but also provides a space for modern people who still practice these arts to display their skills and sell their wares. Amuse Museum, on the other hand, focuses on the performing arts of the past and present, and even houses a functioning Ukiyo-e theater, highlighting drama performed in this beautiful ‘woodcut’ style.

04
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Tempura flavor

Direction
2-chōme-4-1 Asakusa, Taito City, Tōkyō-to 111-0032, Japan

Get directions

Telephone

+81 3-3841-5519

It’s hard to say exactly where tempura comes from in Japan. After all, this fried delicacy only started after foreign merchants began arriving in Japan after its ports opened in the mid-16th century after hundreds of years of isolation, in some ways it is the first form of cooking. of fusion.

That said, the variety and quality of tempura in Asakusa is truly impressive. For a more casual experience, have a quick lunch at Tentake. Daikokuya, on the other hand, is best seasoned at dinner and offers fried cuisine in surprisingly elegant surroundings.

05
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Watch a sumo match

Direction
2-chōme-17-3 Ryōgoku, Sumida City, Tōkyō-a 130-0026, Japan

Get directions

Telephone

+81 3-3631-3856

While sumo matches are hard to come by in Asakusa, the real sumo house is right next door, in the Ryogoku district. Given the size of Tokyo and the distance between its rooms, you can think of this as an amazing thing to do in Asakusa, even if you technically have to leave the room.

You will have to plan well in advance (and be prepared to put in several hours of your time, the matches are not quick!) If you want to participate in a full sumo fight at the Ryogoku Kokugikan Stadium. However, there are other options, whether you book a tour to see a morning sumo practice or just ask one of the sumo wrestlers you are sure to see on the streets here if you can take a picture with him.

06
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Enjoy the best view of Tokyo

Direction
1-chōme-1-2 Oshiage, Sumida City, Tōkyō-to 131-0045, Japan

Get directions

Telephone

+81 570-550-634

Web

Visit the website

The overall feel of Asakusa is modern to futuristic, as mentioned above. If there’s one structure that embodies this aesthetic more than any other in the district (or in Tokyo at all), it’s the Tokyo Sky Tree, which is just a few minutes’ walk (even less by rickshaw) from the landmarks of Asakusa as Senso-ji Temple.

Whether you admire this 2,080-foot behemoth from the ground, or climb up to the observatory to take in what is arguably the most impressive panorama in Tokyo, it’s a must-see during your time in Asakusa.

07
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Then get a lesser known view of Asakusa

Direction
2-chōme-18-9 Kaminarimon, Taito City, Taito-ku, Tōkyō-to 111-0034, Japón

Get directions

Telephone

+81 3-3842-5566

Web

Visit the website

Of course, not all of the great views in Asakusa are particularly high, nor do they allow you to see all of Tokyo. Surely, if you simply want to enjoy a panoramic view of the most important places in Asakusa, you can head to the rooftop of the Asakusa Cultural and Tourist Information Center.

In addition to being free to enter, it allows you to focus on the sights of Asakusa with your aerial photography, not to mention the fact that it is not intimidating if your fear of heights prevents you from climbing the Sky Tree.

08
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Start your journey to Nikko

Direction
1 Chome-1-3 Asakusa, Taito City, Tōkyō-to 111-0032, Japón

Get directions

Most trips from Japan’s capital start from busy train stations like Tokyo, Shinjuku, and Shinagawa, and use trains operated by the national Japan Rail (JR) company. While you can technically get to the UNESCO World Heritage-listed town of Nikko (arguably the best most scenic day trip in Tokyo) using the JR trains from Tokyo Station, the most direct way to get there is to take the private Tobu line, which departs from Asakusa station.

Tip: Unless you can get these other awesome things to do in Asakusa out before lunch, it’s best to spend the night here and leave Asakusa station for Nikko the next morning. Both places are so steeped in history that rushing would hurt them!

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